This is how you should take care of your eyes at work

Do you know how many hours you spend in front of a screen? Do you do it taking into account what your vision and your eyes need? If you work in front of a screen, take note of the following recommendations to maintain good eye health and avoid problems:

Work with optimal lighting. Having natural light in your work environment is best for your eyes and if you are lucky enough to have it in your workplace, you should also have curtains that help reduce possible sun reflections on your face or on the monitor. If you work in rooms without natural light, you must illuminate it correctly with artificial light and avoid working in the dark.

Maintain good posture. Your chair should be comfortable, your back should be supported by the backrest, your feet on the floor and your legs bent at 90º angle. Avoid "strange" or forced postures. The screen must be at eye level so that you do not have to lower or raise your head and your shoulders can be relaxed. 

Be careful with the distance from the screen. The screen should be between 19 and 23 inches; never closer than 15 inches from the eyes and slightly inclined for greater visual comfort.

Adapt your display settings. Adjust the brightness and contrast of your monitor to reduce eyestrain and glare. Luckily, there are now manufacturers that incorporate retina screens or eye protection films that allow us better relaxation when viewing images. The image on the screen should be stable, without glare or reflections.

Give your eyes a rest. Don't forget to take frequent breaks and look away from the screen to observe more distant objects. Performing eye exercises can also be of great help. Remember the 20-20-20 rule, every 20 minutes rest for 20 seconds relaxing and looking at a distance greater than 20 feet.

Blink more. To avoid dry eyes, remember to consciously blink frequently, especially if you are wearing contact lenses.

Avoid rubbing your eyes. When tiredness and visual fatigue appear after a hard day, it is very common to feel the need to rub your eyes. This practice is highly inadvisable because there are many bacteria on the hands that can reach the eye, in addition to being able to irritate them when rubbed.

Now that you know these guidelines to take better care of your eyes at work, do you think you already put them into practice regularly?


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